morgane laouenan

Welcome to my webpage !

I am currently a CNRS researcher at Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.

I was a junior researcher at Sciences-Po LIEPP in 2014-2015 and a postdoctoral fellow at Université catholique de Louvain in 2012-2014.

My research interests focus on discrimination against African immigrants in France and against African-Americans
in the US. I analyze how racial discrimination affects the economic situation of these two minority groups in imperfect labor market models, using search models with matching frictions. I use individual-level data to study the impact of racial prejudice on labor market outcomes of minorities, such as employment, wages and probability of occupying a job in contact with consumers.

Contact

Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne
UMR 8174 du CNRS - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
Maison des Sciences Economiques - 106-112 Boulevard de l'Hôpital - 75647 Paris cedex 13 - France
Morgane.Laouenan@univ-paris1.fr

Employment

- Postdoctoral Fellow, IRES - Université catholique de Louvain, 2012-2014

- Research Scholar/Adjunct Lecturer, Sciences-Po Paris, 2010-2012

Education

- Ph.D. in Economics, Aix-Marseille University (GREQAM), 2012
Advisor: Alain Trannoy (EHESS), Bruno Decreuse (Aix-Marseille University) and Pierre-Philippe Combes (CNRS)
Thesis committee: Bruno Crépon (INSEE-CREST - referee), Denis Fougère (CNRS-CREST),
Laurent Gobillon (INED), and Etienne Wasmer (Sciences-Po - referee)

- Visiting PhD Student, Boston University (MA, USA), Fall 2010

- Master in Public Economics, Aix-Marseille University, 2006-2007

- Magistère d'économie, Sorbonne University, 2004-2006

- Visiting undergraduate student, Middlebury College (VT, USA), 2003-2004


Click here for a complete CV

Customer Discrimination and Employment Outcomes: Theory and Evidence from the French Labor Market, [New Version] [Online Appendix]. With PPh. Combes, B. Decreuse and A. Trannoy, Forthcoming in the Journal of Labor Economics, IZA Discussion Paper No. 8150, April 2014.
The paper investigates the link between the over-exposure of African immigrants to unemployment in France and their under-representation in jobs in contact with customers. We build a two-sector matching model with ethnic sector-speci c preferences, economy-wide employer discrimination, and customer discrimination in jobs in contact with customers. The outcomes of the model allow us to build a test of ethnic discrimination in general and customer discrimination in particular. We run the test on French individual data in a cross-section of local labor markets (Employment Areas). Our results show that there is both ethnic and customer discrimination in the French labor market.

Un cas particulier de discrimination sur le marché du travail : l'accès aux emplois en contact avec le public, Economie et Statistique, n°464-465-466, 2014

Géographie du chômage des personnes d'origine africaine : Une discrimination vis a vis des emplois en contact avec la clientèle ?, with L. Bouvard, P-P Combes, B. Decreuse, B. Schmutz and A. Trannoy, Revue Francaise d'Economie, n°3/vol XXIII, 2009.

Géographie du chômage des personnes d'origine africaine : Pourquoi une si faible mobilité résidentielle ?, with L. Bouvard, P-P Combes, B. Decreuse, B. Schmutz and A. Trannoy, Revue Francaise d'Economie, n°3/vol XXIII, 2009.

A Panel Data Analysis of Taxation in Europe: Social Contributions Matter, with Thierry Warin, ICFAI Journal of Applied Economics, July 2005.

Working Papers

’Can’t get enough’: Prejudice, Contact-jobs and the black-white wage gap in the US. IZA DP No. 8006, February 2014
The wage gap between African-Americans and whites is substantial in the US and has slightly narrowed over the past 30 years. There is reason to believe that discrimination driven by prejudice plays a part in explaining this residual wage gap. Whereas racial prejudice has substantially declined over the past 30 years, the wage differential has slightly converged overtime. This ‘prejudice puzzle’ raises other reasons in explaining the absence of strong convergence of this racial gap. In this paper, I assess the impact which of the boom of jobs in contact with customers has on blacks'earnings. I develop a search-matching model to predict the negative impact which of the share of these contact jobs has on blacks’ earnings in the presence of customer discrimination. Using the US Census, the General Social Survey and the Occupation Information Network, I find that black men’s relative earnings are lower in areas where shares of prejudiced individuals and of contact-jobs are high. I also estimate that the decreased exposure to racial prejudice is associated with a higher convergence of the residual earnings gap, whereas the expansion of contact-jobs partly explains its persistence.


'Hate at first sight': Evidence of Consumer Discrimination against African-Americans in the US, UCL Discussion Paper 2013-32 Revision requested from Labour Economics.
The paper runs the customer discrimination test provided by Combes et al. (2013) on US data. This test is based on a two-sector matching model with racial sector-specific preferences or abilities, employer discrimination and customer discrimination. The strategy makes it pos- sible to disentangle customer from employer discrimination. My results prove the existence of discrimination against African-Americans at job entry from both employers and consumers in the US. It also reports that racial prejudice has a quantitative effect on the relative employment and contact probabilities of blacks. A decrease in the intensity of discrimination by one standard deviation raises the raw employment rate of blacks by 15 percent and increases the proportion of blacks in jobs in contact with customers by 20 percent.

Work in Progress

Ethnic Networks and the Spatial Mismatch: Evidence from Public Housing, with Gregory Verdugo

The Price is (not) right: Ethnic Discrimination on an online marketplace of vacation rentals, with Roland Rathelot

Role of TV Programs on Extreme Right-Wing Voting Behavior in France, with Camille Hémet

Adjunct Lecturer

- Race Discrimination in the Labor Market, PhD, Sciences-Po Paris, (Spring 2011)



Teaching Assistant

- Macroeconomics, Graduate, Sciences-Po Paris, (Fall 2011)

- Macroeconomics, Undergraduate, Sciences-Po Reims - Euro-American Campus, (2011, 2012)

- Microeconomics, Undergraduate, Aix-Marseille University, (2009)

- Statistics, Undergraduate, Aix-Marseille University, (2007, 2008)



Teaching evaluations and slides are available upon request